In memoriam

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Adrienne Elisha
Adrienne Elisha ------- 08/10/1958 - 6/12/2017 ---------- Obituary from Catskill Mountain News, July 5 2017 -------------- It is with great sadness that the family of Adrienne Joy Elisha (“Adie”) announces her passing on Monday, June 12, 2017, at the age of 58 years, after a courageous battle with cancer. Adie was born in Glen Cove, and lived in Bayville, L.I. during her first 10 years. The daughter of distinguished professional musicians, the late Dorothy Kesner and Paul Elisha, she was an extraordinary artist whose creative genius included the Performing Arts, Composition, Poetry and Painting. She was a champion of new music – equally talented as both a skilled violist as well as a composer. Her voice was distinctly contemporary but her inspiration was drawn directly from her heart. Mario Davidovsky had described her sextet (Anthelion) as “A new kind of polyphony.” Leonard Bernstein described her work as “Excitingly unpredictable, yet inevitable in retrospect.” Adrienne was a 2007 winner of the Thayer Award in music composition and received her Ph D in composition from the University of Buffalo, working with David Felder as a Presidential Doctoral Fellow. Also a graduate of the Indiana University School of Music in Bloomington, Indiana and the Cleveland Institute of Music, Ms. Elisha’s grants and commissions included those from Meet the Composer and The National Music Teachers’ Association, by whom she was named the 1997 Ohio Composer of the Year. Her credits went on to include Fortnightly Music of Cleveland, Cleveland Chamber Music Society, New Ear Ensemble of Kansas City and the American Music Center. Her works have been featured both nationally and internationally at June in Buffalo, The Colorado Springs New Music Symposium, The Chintimini Chamber Music Festival and at the International Bartok Festival in Szombathely, Hungary, where she performed her own solo and chamber works and premiered those of other composers. “Cry of the Dove,” her cello concerto, was commissioned and premiered by the Cleveland Chamber Symphony for Solo Cellist, Steven Elisha, who performed it subsequently with The Grand Rapids Symphony, under the direction of conductor, David Lockington. In addition to solo and chamber appearances at new music festivals, Dr. Elisha was principal violist with The Center for 21st Century Music Ensemble and the June in Buffalo Chamber Ensemble. She also performed frequently with the Boston Modern Orchestra Project. During the Warsaw Autumn Festival, she was featured as soloist and composer on Polish Radio broadcasts, performing new works for solo viola, including her own. Both of her talents were on display in Bern, Switzerland, where her composition, inspired by Paul Klee’s painting, “Once Emerged from the Grey of Night,” was featured. As guest violist, Dr. Elisha also performed with the Ensemble Paul Klee in the premiere of Liber Fulguralis by Tristan Murail. Other performances and commissions included those by solo bassist James VanDemark, the Rochester City Ballet, Musaica Chamber Ensemble, Ensemble Interface, Netzwerk Neue Musik, eighth blackbird, The Chamber Orchestra of Boston, The American Chamber Ensemble, The Denali Ensemble, New York New Music Ensemble and The Arditti String Quartet. In 2009, nominated by Peter Eötvös, Ms. Elisha was the recipient of the Herrenhaus Composer residency in Edenkoben, Germany, where she spent five months as resident composer. She was also named a Composer Fellow of the 2011 Wellesley Composers Conference, led by Mario Davidovsky, director, and was awarded a 2011 Outer Cape Cod Artist’s Residency. She was a recipient of fellowships from the Mac- Dowell Colony and The Rockefeller Foundation at the Bellagio Center. Recent World Premieres included “Lithuanian Dances” with the Nashua Chamber Orchestra under the baton of David Feltner, and “New Overture” with the Galveston Symphony Orchestra, Trond Saeverud, Conductor. She is survived and lovingly remembered by her husband of 23 years, Peter Laki, stepson, Ben Niran, brother and sister inlaw, Paul Hunkins and Ann Gore, sister and brother-in-law, Jill Hunkins and Carlos Castillo, sister and brother-in-law, Nella Hunkins and Richard Slessor, brother and sister-in-law, Steven and Larisa Elisha. She will be forever remembered by her nieces: Michelle Jezierski, Joanna May Hunkins, nephews: Serge Hunkins, Alain Hunkins, Ron Castillo, Douglas Castillo, Michael Castillo, Nicholas de Leval Jezierski, Patrick Elisha as well as extended family and dear friends. Interment will be Monday, July 10, 2017, 2:30 PM, at Beth Moses Cemetery, 1500 Wellwood Ave., West Babylon. 11704 (Farmingdale - Suffolk County). Additional memorial services are planned in Cleveland, Ohio on July 29 and at Bard College, Annandale on-Hudson. (date and time TBA).
Alice Eisen
Alice Eisen
Aunt Sophie
Aunt Sophie
Barbara Anderson
Barbara Anderson
Bob Lehman
Bob Lehman
Bolek Greczynski
Bolec Greczynski. An obituary of art therapist Bolec Greczynski can be found in the New York Times, March 10, 1995, at http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/10/obituaries/bolek-greczynski-44-art-therapist-at-creedmoor.html.
Charlie Carreiro
Charlie Carriero. Charlie Carriero was married to Nancy Glaser, who is Trudy Sullivan's daughter. Trudy was Paul, Teddy and Billie Sullivan's sister and is now dead. Nancy Glaser is the sister of Patty (Glaser) Orlowsky. Charlie Carriero's obituary can be found in the Cape Cod Times, July 1, 2003. "Charles P. “Chuck” Carreiro, 50, who leaves a brother on the Cape, died unexpectedly Friday at his company after a brief illness.He was the husband of Sheila Ann Carreiro and the former husband of Arlene Jane (Ahola) Carreiro.Born in Norwood, Mass., he graduated from Marshfield High School. He lived in Cumberland for the past 16 years after living in Foxboro. He was owner and operator of Detailing Plus Car Reconditioning in Franklin for the past 14 years and was previously a machinist at Bird and Sons in North Walpole for 20 years. He enjoyed cars, woodworking, spending time on boats, fishing and making models."
Chip Elwell
Chip Elwell. Died in 1986
Dave Dresher
Dave Dresher. Dave was married to my mother's niece.
Donald Droll
An obituary for art dealer Donald Droll can be found in the New York Times, November 19, 1985, at http://www.nytimes.com/1985/11/19/arts/donald-droll-58-dies-art-dealer-and-patron.html.
Dr. Paul Hershenshon
Dr. Paul Hershenson AGE: 83 • White Plains Dr. Paul Hershenson, a longtime practicing internist and pulmonologist in White Plains, N.Y., died on March 8, 2017 at his home in Manhattan at the age of 83. The cause was Progressive AML. Born in 1933 in Brooklyn, Dr. Hershenson graduated from City College of New York and the Chicago Medical School, completing his residency training at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx. He began his private practice in Ardsley, N.Y. in 1964, relocating to White Plains in 1978 and practicing full time for 52 years until becoming ill last August. He was affiliated with White Plains Hospital all his professional life. Dr. Hershenson was an avid bicyclist who spent vacations riding in the mountains of Europe and the United States. He was a frequent visitor at Manhattan art galleries and museums, as well as the Metropolitan Opera. Devoted to staying abreast of the latest developments in medicine, he also read fiction for pleasure and could usually be found with a book. Survivors include a daughter, Nina Parker (Chris), of East Islip, N.Y.; a son, Michael, of Mamaroneck; a grandson, Justin Parker, of East Islip, and a sister, Bea Epstein (Dr. Stephen E.) of Rockville, MD. Funeral services will be held on March 12th at 12pm at the Ballard-Durand Funeral Home 2 Maple Avenue at South Broadway, White Plains, New York. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in his memory to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 5th Avenue, New York NY 10028. Published in the The Journal News on Mar. 10, 2017
Edith MacKennan
Edith MacKennan, Deceased - September 10, 2006.
Elaine Shipman
Elaine Shipman. An obituary of choreographer Elaine Shipman can be found in the New York Times, March 22, 2013, at http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/nytimes/obituary.aspx?pid=163771281.
Elizabeth Murray
Elizabeth Murray, 1940-2007. An obituary for artist Elizabeth Murray can be found in the New York Times, August 13, 2007 at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/13/arts/design/13murray.html.
Ethel Plimack
Ethel’s mantra, shared with her siblings, was “keep moving”—and that she did. Whether it was working, folk dancing, knitting or swimming, Ethel always kept moving during her life time. And what a long life time it was—two weeks shy of 108 years. Apart from early family gatherings, my first memory was of my aunt Ethel sending me magazines at summer camp. Later in life, books of all subjects, from various programs at Marymount, found their way to me. Then there was the knitting. Lots of favorite sweaters were knitted by Aunt Ethel. More recently, with Janet’s help and encouragement, baby hats and scarves galore were shared with many. When I hurt my back at age 30 in New York, and could barely get out of bed--Ethel came to the rescue and cooked some meals for me. We were able to return the cooking favor when Ethel visited Beth and me in D.C. She loved the home-made waffles -- made on my parents’ old waffle maker. Whenever we talked about her visits, she mentioned the waffles and the bonsai collection at the Arboretum—another favorite.. Then there was the “sister act” between Ethel and Shirley. We learned that you are never too old to argue about who dad loved best! And who would have thought that Ethel would have become the fashionista these past few years—certainly not Shirley! Thank you Josie! Ethel was a doer, not a complainer. However, she did complain when Janet insisted she write a will at age 99! She had hoped not to have to deal with such issues—and she sure beat all odds at doing so! Ethel will be missed. 11/7/18 Written by Robin (Sherman?) Sylvia Plimack Mangold's cousin
Florence Alper
Florence Alpert. Florence and her husband Irving were friends of my parents
Francesca Consagra
CONSAGRA--Francesca. Curator Emerita at the Blanton Museum of Art, died peacefully in Austin on December 16, 2018 after a valiant battle with ovarian cancer. She was 60. A daughter of Pietro Consagra, one of Italy's most prominent post-war abstract sculptors, and Sophie Chandler Consagra, Director and President of the American Academy in Rome, Francesca embodied the best of both cultures and families in her wonderful blend of sophisticated creativity and down- to-earth pragmatism. A brilliant scholar and curator of Italian Baroque and Northern Renaissance prints and paintings, Francesca brought deep passion and intellectual rigor to all she did. After graduating cum laude from Connecticut College, she received her Ph.D. in Art History from Johns Hopkins University. Following fellowships at the National Gallery, the Metropolitan Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Francesca was appointed the Philip and Lynn Straus Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, where she was also a member of the faculty in the Art Department. From 1999-2008, she served as Curator and Head of the Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Saint Louis Art Museum and subsequently became the Senior Curator at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts. In 2012, Francesca joined the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin, where she was the Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings, and European Paintings. Her numerous exhibitions and publications reflected Francesca's broad historical and cultural knowledge as well as her gift for communicating complex ideas with grace and eloquence. Francesca's warmth, kindness, intelligence, and love of life were reflected in her fervent engagement with the world around her. Beauty in its many forms filled her soul, from a master drawing or a second-century Buddha, to a 'Sconset sunset or a swim off the beaches of Crete. Francesca was deeply loved by her family and friends, who treasured her generosity of spirit, her commitment to the greater good, her fabulous sense of humor, her resolute honesty, her courage, and her strength. Francesca is survived by her husband William Herndon, the love of her life, and her beloved son John Ray. Published in The New York Times on Dec. 21, 2018
Frank Murphy
Mary and Richard Black
George Wexler
George Wexler. A notice of death for artist George Wexler can be found in the New York Times, June 21, 2006, at http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9903E0DA113AF932A15755C0A9609C8B63.
Harriet Moore
Harriet Moore. My first Cousin.
Harriet Shorr
Acclaimed American painter and teacher, died on Saturday, April 9th at Beth Israel Hospital, age 76. She was ill for several years, but the immediate cause of death was pneumonia. Harriet was Professor Emerita at the School of Art and Design at Purchase College. She was known for large-scale realistic still life paintings that were full of light and color. Harriet was also an extraordinarily gifted writer and poet. She leaves her husband Jim Long, daughters Ruth and Sasha, three grandchildren and her brother Bill Shorr. Harriet grew up in Sea Gate in Brooklyn and is remembered with pride and love by her childhood friends Roberta, Simmie and Linda. Published in The New York Times on Apr. 14, 2016
Helen Renzi
Helen Renzi. An obituary of Helen Renzi can be found at Williamstown.com, July 14, 2012, at http://www.williamstown.com/obituaries_new.php?ob_id=9831.
Herb Vogel
Herb Vogel. Art collector Herbert Vogel's obituary can be found in the New York Times, July 23, 2012, at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/24/arts/design/herbert-vogel-postal-clerk-and-modern-art-collector-dies-at-89.html.
Iris Donnenfeld
Iris Donnenfeld. Iris was born on March 4, 1941 and passed away on Monday, August 15, 2011. Iris was a resident of Brooklyn, New York. Iris was one of my sister Eileen's best friend when we were growing up in crown Heights, Brooklyn. She and Eileen were often up to mischief.
Irving Alper
Irving Alpert. Irving and Florence Alpert were frinds of my parents.
Jake Berthot
The New York Times By Roberta Smith Jan. 14, 2015 Jake Berthot, a painter who gained notice in New York City for his romantically minimal style, then found inspiration in the natural world after moving north to a hamlet in Ulster County, died on Dec. 30 at his home in Accord, N.Y. He was 75. Betty Cuningham, whose gallery represented him, confirmed his death. She said he had long been ill but did not specify a cause. Mr. Berthot (pronounced BEAR-TOE) had a brief flirtation with Minimal Art in the mid-1960s. But, like many members of his generation, he soon sought ways to soften, complicate and enrich the style’s severity. He was guided in this by his admiration for Abstract Expressionists like Milton Resnick and Mark Rothko, whose work was simplified but emotive. He began to work in subtle monochromes of gray and green in the late 1960s in a manner similar to that of the painter Brice Marden. But Mr. Berthot’s surfaces were differentiated by their expressive texture and their suggestions of space and atmosphere. In many ways, Mr. Berthot spent his career exploring how to supplement and expand on the modernist monochrome without straying too far from it. At first he attached narrow vertical bars to either side of all-gray canvases. He also framed thickly worked monochromes with more thinly painted canvases, creating the effect of a window or of an abstract painting within an abstract painting. For a while he pursued thickly built-up surfaces to which he added ovals or column-like rectangles in contrasting, sometimes even bright, colors. Most of his paintings began with an underlying grid of pencil that his brushwork alternately denied and confirmed. After 1996, when Mr. Berthot left Manhattan for Accord, the natural world became an increasing influence. He turned to depicting trees and hills so close in tone to their backgrounds that they almost seemed carved from them. Some of his most beautiful paintings were nocturnal landscapes or expanses of night skies illuminated by a few rays from the moon. These works had a timeless quality and reflected his admiration for 19th-century landscape painters like George Inness, Albert Pinkham Ryder and J. M. W. Turner. He once told an interviewer that he was “not interested in the new but in trying to make paintings that refuse to grow old.” His art started rounding back toward abstraction in 2008. John Alex Berthot was born in Niagara Falls, N.Y., on March 30, 1939. His father abandoned the family when John was quite young, and he grew up on his grandparents’ truck farm in central Pennsylvania. He received his first drawing lessons from his grandmother. Mr. Berthot initially studied at a commercial art school in Pittsburgh but realized that he lacked the necessary precision in drawing. Moving to New York City, he worked as a window dresser in the Bronx. When his wife got a secretarial job at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, he was able to attend classes there tuition free. At Pratt he began to paint seriously and soon had his first experience as a teacher. Starting in 1974, he taught for extended periods at the Cooper Union, Yale University and the School of Visual Arts. Mr. Berthot had his first gallery show in New York in 1963 and showed regularly at the McKee Gallery and then the Betty Cuningham Gallery, both in Manhattan. Surveys of his work were held at Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass., in 1988 and at the Phillips Collection in Washington in 1996. When he decided to bequeath the paintings in his studio to the Phillips, the museum offered to exhibit them, as a gift, during his lifetime. Mr. Berthot, who once described painting as “the only thing I can do,” declined, saying that he needed the paintings around him. His marriages to Ginny MacKenzie and Kristin Flynn both ended in divorce. He is survived by his son, John, from his first marriage. A version of this article appears in print on Jan. 19, 2015, on Page A14 of the New York edition with the headline: Jake Berthot, 75, Abstract Painter Inspired by Nature. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe
Jean Michel Basquiat
Jean Michel Basquiat. Artist Jean Michael Basquiat's obituary can be found at http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/08/09/specials/basquiat-obit.html.
Jeffrey Schaire
1954-October 30, 1995 About the Archive This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them. Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems. Please send reports of such problems to archive_feedback@nytimes.com. November 1, 1995, Page 00019The New York Times Archives Jeffrey Schaire, a former editor in chief of Art and Antiques magazine, died on Monday at his home in Manhattan. He was 41. The cause was AIDS, said his sister, Paula. Mr. Schaire was born in Fresh Meadows, Queens. He graduated from the State University College at Binghamton and earned a master's degree in English literature from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. After working at Farrar, Straus & Giroux and at Harper's magazine, he joined Art and Antiques in 1983, and became editor in chief in 1987. Under his guidance, the magazine invited M. F. K. Fisher, D. M. Thomas, John Updike, Pete Hamill and others to write on art, and broke the story of Andrew Wyeth's unknown "Helga" paintings. After resigning in 1992, Mr. Schaire served briefly as editor of Body Positive, a magazine for those infected with the H.I.V. virus. In addition to his sister, of San Francisco and Manhattan, he is survived by a brother, Scott, of Atlanta. A version of this obituary; biography appears in print on November 1, 1995, on Page D00019 of the National edition with the headline: Jeffrey Schaire, 41, Art Magazine Editor. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe
Jenny Roseman
Jenny Roseman. My paternal grandmother.
Jerome Badanes
Jerome Badanes. Novelist Jerome Badanes's obituary can be found at http://www.nytimes.com/1995/05/21/obituaries/jerome-badanes-novelist-dies-at-58.html.
Joan Hull
FLOWERS & GIFTS Joan L. Hull, 91, of Rhinebeck and formerly Hyde Park, passed away on November 5, 2018. Born in Brooklyn, New York on August 11, 1927 to Christine and J. Parker Hull, Joan grew up on an apple farm in Clintondale, New York. As a young girl, Joan, attended Westtown School in Westtown, Pennsylvania graduating in 1945. In 1949 Joan earned a degree from Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana and continued her education at Katherine Gibbs School, New York, New York, graduating in 1951. Afterwards, Joan moved to Hyde Park, New York with her parents and began working at Western Publishing Company, Poughkeepsie, New York in 1952. While at Western Publishing she was employed as an executive secretary until her retirement in 1982. Joan continued her career as an administrative assistant in the art department at Vassar College until 1992 after which she retired and took up residence in Rhinebeck, New York. Joan always said her years working with the art faculty at Vassar were her greatest joy and best memories. After retirement, Joan developed a passion for genealogy and spent countless hours searching historical records, compiling information from grave site tombstones, and documenting cultural and historic data from Friends’ Cemeteries. Additionally, Joan was a golfer and enjoyed her membership at Dutchess Golf Club in Poughkeepsie. Joan touched many people. She was a loyal friend to many and a devoted daughter who took great care of her parents until their passing. She loved a good laugh and enjoyed sipping an occasional Canadian Club with friends. Her laugh and sense of humor will be remembered, always. Her later years were spent quietly at the Baptist Home at Brookmeade in Rhinebeck, New York where she died peacefully. Joan is survived by many dear friends. There are no calling hours.
John Chamberlain
John Chamberlain. Artist John Chamberlain's obituary can be found in the New York Times, December 22, 2011, at http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/22/arts/design/john-chamberlain-artist-of-auto-metal-dies-at-84.html.
Joseph Cornell
An obituary for sculptor Joseph Cornell can be found in the New York Times, Sunday, December 31, 1972. https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1972/12/31/90732055.html?pageNumber=37
Joyce and Billy Sullivan
Joyce and Billy Sullivan. Joyce (Joyce Alice Sullivan) April 12, 1933-June 7, 1999. Billy (William Michael Sullivan - January 17, 1932-October 30, 1994. They were cousins of Catherine Murphy, niece and nephew of Kay Kay (Catherine Muutphy Sr.).
Judy and Frederick Busch
Judy and Frederick Busch. Poet and novelist Frederick Busch's obituary can be found in the New York Times, February 25, 2006, at http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/25/pageoneplus/arts/frederick-busch-author-of-poetic-fiction-dies-at-64-827150.html; Judy Busch's obituary can be found in the Evening Sun, Jaunary 4, 2007, at http://www.evesun.com/obituaries/people/Judith-Busch/379/.
Kay Murphy
Catherine Ellen O'Reilly Murphy (Kay Murphy), August 25, 1905 (in Cambridge, MA) - August 10, 1991 (in Ayer, MA).
Leo Moore
Leo Moore. Leo was my uncle. He was married to my mother's sister, Sylvia Moore (born, Silverman).
Linda Neely
Linda Neely
Lottie Robins
Lottie Robins. A notice of death can be found in the New York Times, August 15, 2007, at http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E02E4DD103AF936A2575BC0A9619C8B63.
Louis Roseman
Louis Francis Murphy (Frank Murphy), January 13, 1903 (in Boston, MA)-July 15, 1979 (in Ayer, MA)
Mary Buckly
Mary Buckly
Michael Mazur
Michael Mazur. -------- 11/02/1935 - 08/18/2009 -------- Obituary from the New York Times , August 29, 2009 ---------- Michael Mazur, a relentlessly inventive printmaker, painter and sculptor whose work encompassed social documentation, narrative and landscape while moving back and forth between figuration and abstraction, died on Aug. 18 in Cambridge, Mass. He was 73 and lived in Cambridge and Provincetown, Mass. The cause was congestive heart failure, said Mary Ryan, his New York dealer. Mr. Mazur first came to public notice in the early 1960s with two series of etchings and lithographs depicting inmates in a mental asylum in Howard, R.I. The series, “Closed Ward” and “Locked Ward,” rendered with the hand of a master draftsman, showed human beings in unbearable torment. These lost souls, John Canaday wrote in The New York Times, “have the terrible anonymity of individuals who cannot be reached, whose ugly physical presence is only the symptom of a tragic spiritual isolation.” Mr. Mazur’s restless artistic temperament led him to explore a variety of styles and media, shuttling between realism and abstraction. He produced narrative paintings like “Incident at Walden Pond,” a triptych from the late 1970s depicting the aftermath of a rape, and, beginning in the 1990s, abstract landscapes based on his own vascular system and on Chinese landscapes of the 12th to 15th centuries. After seeing an exhibition of Degas monotypes at the Fogg Museum in 1968, he began exploring that medium, most notably in the monumental Wakeby landscapes of 1983, depicting Wakeby Lake on Cape Cod, and in a series of illustrations for Robert Pinsky’s translation of Dante’s “Inferno,” published in 1994. “It’s hard to characterize him because he was always trying new things,” said Clifford S. Ackley, the chairman of prints, drawings and photographs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. “He did not fall into the trap of repeating himself the way so many older artists do. In the last week of his life he was doing pen-and-ink drawings of flowers and gardens.” Michael Burton Mazur grew up on the Upper East Side of Manhattan and attended the Horace Mann School in the Bronx, where he belonged to an art club whose members included the future curator Henry Geldzahler and the future New Yorker cartoonist Ed Koren. While attending Amherst College he studied with the printmaker and sculptor Leonard Baskin, who was teaching at Smith College. After taking a year off to study in Italy, where his lifelong fascination with Dante began, he received a bachelor’s degree in 1957 and went on to earn bachelor’s and master’s degrees in fine art from the Yale School of Art and Architecture. While at Yale he married Gail Beckwith, a poet known by her married name. She survives him, as do their two children, Dan, of Cambridge, and Kathe, of Los Angeles, and two grandchildren. Mr. Mazur taught at the Rhode Island School of Design and Brandeis University from 1961 to 1975 while exhibiting frequently in New York and Boston. In 2000 a traveling retrospective of his prints opened at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The catalog, “The Prints of Michael Mazur With a Catalogue Raisonné, 1956-1999,” was published that year. “I’ll Tell What I Saw,” a selection of excerpts from Dante’s “Divine Comedy” illustrated by Mr. Mazur, is to be published by Sarabande Books in November. Although deadly serious as an artist, Mr. Mazur had a sly wit. In 1984 he wrote an article for the Op-Ed page of The New York Times proposing a W.P.A.-style project under which artists could decorate nuclear warheads, just as Renaissance artists embellished armor and weapons. “It is not hard to imagine the vivid colors, bas reliefs, even graffiti, that would make spectacles of beauty of those dull cones,” he wrote. In time, he suggested, the warheads would find their way into private collections and museums, thereby ending the possibility that they might be deployed.
Murray Skall
Murray Skall. My cousin.
Nancy Graves
October 24, 1995, The New York Times Archives. Nancy Graves, an erudite Post-Minimalist artist who combined abstraction with an exacting naturalism, died on Saturday at New N.Y. The cause was cancer, said her husband, Avery L. Smith. A prolific artist who worked in painting, sculpture, printmaking and film, Ms. Graves first made her presence felt on the New York art scene in the late 1960's and 70's, with life-size sculptures of camels that seemed as accurate as a natural history display (down to the real skin). Closer examination, however, revealed myriad distortions of both form and surface, as well as deliberate signs of handwork, so that the ultimate effect was strangely abstract. Although idiosyncratic, the camels were representative of a widespread effort among younger artists to take Minimalism's emphasis on given facts and forms, as well as new materials, into unexpected areas. Like-minded artists included Eva Hesse, Chuck Close, Bruce Nauman and Richard Serra, to whom Ms. Graves was married from 1965 to 1970. Nancy Stevenson Graves was born in Pittsfield, Mass., on Dec. 23, 1940, and throughout her life she retained the reserve and dry humor of a quintessential New Englander. Her dual interest in art and science was encouraged by frequent visits to the Berkshire Museum, where her father worked and which had collections devoted to both art and natural history. After graduating from Vassar College as an English major in 1961, she attended Yale, where she earned bachelor's and master's of fine arts degrees from the School of Art and Architecture in 1964. Grants enabled her to spend the next two years studying in Europe, first in Paris and then in Florence, where the life-size wax studies of an 18th-century anatomist named Susini inspired her to work from natural forms. Continue reading the main story She settled on the camel as the first of these forms, and with typical thoroughness spent three months learning carpentry to be able to devise an armature. Working in Fiberglas, latex, marble dust and other unorthodox materials, Ms. Graves moved on to camel skeletons and bones, which she dispersed about the floor or hung from ceilings, and based other works on a variety of archeological and paleontological subjects, including fossils, totems and mummies. In the early 1970's, she traveled to Morocco, making several films whose repeated sequences of camel herds emphasized the mesmerizing rhythms of their movements. In 1972 Ms. Graves forsook sculpture for painting, making beautifully colored, ostensibly abstract works that were often based on a wide range of maps and charts, including those of the ocean floor and the surfaces of Mars and the moon. When she returned to sculpture in the late 1970's, she learned the lost-wax process so she could work in bronze, experimenting with unusual patinas that translated her natural forms into a palette of highly artificial hot pinks, blues and yellows. She gradually expanded her vocabulary to include not only plants, flowers, fish and occasional pieces of the human skeleton but also man-made objects like fans, colanders and tools. These disparate parts were assembled into gracefully balanced sculptures whose elegant linearity recalled the "drawing in space" sculptures of David Smith. At the end of her life, Ms. Graves was incorporating handblown glass into her sculptures and experimenting with poly-optics, a glasslike material that can be cast. Ms. Graves, whose first New York exhibition was at the Graham Gallery in 1968, has been represented by M. Knoedler & Company since 1980. She exhibited extensively in galleries in the United States and Europe and is represented in museums around the world. Her most recent museum retrospective, organized by the Fort Worth Art Museum, traveled to the Brooklyn Museum in 1987. An exhibition of new hand-painted prints closed on Saturday at the Betsy Senior Gallery in SoHo. In addition to her husband, she is survived by her mother, Mary Bates of Pittsfield; a sister, Judith G. Clarke of Worthington, Mass., and two stepsons, Barrett L. and Carter L. Smith.
Nancy Willard
Nancy Willard -------- 06/26/1936 - 02/19/2017 -------- Obituary from the New York Times, March 6, 2017 -------- Nancy Willard, a prolific author whose 70 books of poems and fiction enchanted children and adults alike with a lyrical blend of fanciful illusion and stark reality, died on Feb. 19 at her home in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. She was 80. The cause was coronary and pulmonary arrest, her husband, the photographer Eric Lindbloom, said. Ms. Willard’s 1982 picture book, “A Visit to William Blake’s Inn: Poems for Innocent and Experienced Travelers,” was the first volume of poetry to receive the Newbery Medal, the country’s highest honor for children’s writing. Illustrated by Alice and Martin Provensen, it also received a Caldecott Honor as one of the best illustrated books of the year. It was the first time a Newbery winner was also named a Caldecott book. Ms. Willard traced her weaving of fancy and realism to her upbringing. Her father was a chemistry professor who perfected a method of rustproofing; her mother, she said, was a romantic who read to her daughters during summer boating idylls. “I grew up aware of two ways of looking at the world that are opposed to each other and yet can exist side by side in the same person,” Ms. Willard wrote in an essay in Writer magazine. “One is the scientific view. The other is the magic view.” In “William Blake’s Inn,” she transformed the English poet and printmaker into a hotelier who keeps an inn for a host of imaginary guests. “Nancy Willard’s imagination — in verse or prose, for children or adults — builds castles stranger than any mad King of Bavaria ever built,” the poet Donald Hall wrote in The New York Times Book Review in 1981. “She imagines with a wonderful concreteness. But also, she takes real language and by literal-mindedness turns it into the structure of dream.” He continued: “If you know children virtuous in imagination, give them this book in which ‘The Wise Cow Enjoys a Cloud’: “Where did you sleep last night, Wise Cow? Where did you lay your head?” “I caught my horns on a rolling cloud and made myself a bed, and in the morning ate it raw on freshly buttered bread.” While she was best known for her children’s books, Ms. Willard also wrote novels for adults. In 1993 the Times critic Michiko Kakutani described her second, “Sister Water,” as “a luminous, lyrical novel about familial love and loss, a novel that almost literally hums with the power of her language.” Nancy Margaret Willard was born in Ann Arbor, Mich., on June 26, 1936, the daughter of Hobart Willard, who taught at the University of Michigan, and the former Margaret Shepard. The first texts she read, she said, were the labels on canned goods in her kitchen. (“They gave me an eclectic vocabulary: ‘spinach,’ ‘green beans,’ ‘registered trademark,’ ‘net weight.’ ”) She published her first poem when she was 7, she said. Ms. Willard, an English major, graduated from the University of Michigan in 1958 and went on to earn a master’s at Stanford, with a thesis on medieval folk songs, and a doctorate at the University of Michigan. She taught creative writing at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie from 1965 until she retired in 2013. Her first children’s book, “Sailing to Cythera: And Other Anatole Stories,” was published in 1974 after her son, James Lindbloom, was born. In addition to her husband, he survives her. (She published other “Anatole” stories, and James became a model for a character in several other books.) Ms. Willard had no illusions about her young audience. “Writing a book of poems for children is like sending a package to a child at camp: The cookies are fed to the fish, the books are fly swatters and the baseball cards are traded,” she once observed. “You never know the use to which your gift — or your poems — will be put. if you’re lucky, children a hundred years hence will be skipping rope to them or muttering them over the graves of dead cats.” While her style evolved, one ingredient remained integral. “Most of us grow up and put magic away with other childish things,” she explained in Writer magazine. “But I think we can all remember a time when magic was as real to us as science, and the things we couldn’t see were as important as the things we could.” She added: “I believe that all small children and some adults hold this view together with the scientific ones. I also believe that the great books for children come from those writers who hold both.”

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