In memoriam

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Richard Rosenblum
New York Times by Holland Cotter February 20, 2000 Richard Rosenblum, a sculptor and a collector of Asian art, died on Tuesday at his home in Newton, Mass. He was 59. Link - http://www.nytimes.com/2000/02/20/nyregion/richard-rosenblum-59-sculptor-and-a-collector-of-asian-art.html
Richard Artschwager
The New York Times By Ken Johnson Feb. 10, 2013 Richard Artschwager, a painter and sculptor whose witty, contradictory mixing of artistic genres made him one of the most critically admired artists to emerge in the 1960s, died early Saturday in Albany. He was 89. His death, at a hospital, followed a recent stroke, his wife, Ann, said. The death also followed by less than a week the closing of a career retrospective of Mr. Artschwager’s work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan, his second to be mounted there. He lived in Hudson, N.Y., in Columbia County. At a time when most artists worked in clearly determined styles, Mr. Artschwager slyly confounded the usual categories. His most famous sculpture, “Table With Pink Tablecloth,” from 1964, is something of a cross between Pop Art and a Minimalist cube by Donald Judd: a box neatly veneered with pieces of colored Formica to create the image of a wooden table with a square pink tablecloth draped on it. Mr. Artschwager went on to produce variations on the forms of chairs, tables, doors and other domestic objects in styles ranging from severely geometric to surrealistically distorted. In the late 1960s, he invented an abstract form he called a “blp,” a small, black, oblong shape that he would recreate in various materials and install in unexpected places to punctuate, mysteriously, gallery and museum spaces. He also placed dozens of “blps,” in the form of reliefs, stencils or decals, outside museums for viewers to go hunting for or stumble upon. Some are to be found on the elevated High Line park in Lower Manhattan near the site of the Whitney’s future home. Mr. Artschwager’s paintings were often paradoxical. He painted black and white copies of found photographs — group portraits, pictures of buildings and other anonymous images — on textured Celotex panels, a common building material. Ostentatious frames made of painted wood, Formica or polished metal were usually part of the total piece. He once said: “Sculpture is for the touch, painting is for the eye. I wanted to make a sculpture for the eye and a painting for the touch.” Richard Ernst Artschwager was born on Dec. 26, 1923, in Washington. His father, a German immigrant, was a botanist, trained at Cornell University; his mother, a Ukrainian immigrant, was an artist who studied at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington and at the National Academy of Design in New York. In 1935, the family moved to Las Cruces, N.M., a better climate for the artist’s father, who had tuberculosis. Like his father, Mr. Artschwager studied at Cornell, concentrating on mathematics and sciences, though he was deeply interested in art. Before completing his degree he was drafted into the Army in 1944 and saw combat in Europe, suffering a slight wound at the Battle of the Bulge. Afterward he was assigned to counterintelligence in Vienna, where he met and, in 1946, married his first wife, Elfriede Wejmelka. Back in the United States after the war, Mr. Artschwager completed his bachelor’s degree at Cornell but soon, with his wife’s strong encouragement, decided to become an artist. He moved to New York and began attending the Studio School of the painter Amédée Ozenfant, who, along with Le Corbusier Foundation in Paris, had founded a form of late Cubism called Purism. By then the couple had a child, and Mr. Artschwager supported his family as a bank clerk and then a furniture maker. In the early ’50s he stopped making art and went into business building furniture until a fire destroyed his workshop in 1958. Resuming art making, he had his first exhibition — of paintings and watercolors of Southwestern landscapes — at the Art Directions Gallery in New York. In 1960, an exhibition of assemblages by the sculptor Mark di Suvero inspired Mr. Artschwager to begin using his woodworking skills to make his own sculpture. A year later, a photograph picked up on the street prompted him to start making paintings based on black and white photographs. A big break came when he sent, unsolicited, a note and slides to the Leo Castelli Gallery, New York’s leading showcase for new art. The gallery quickly took him on for a group show that included Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol. He remained with Castelli for 30 years. It was at the Castelli gallery, in 1965, that Mr. Artschwager had the first show of work that was recognizably his own. During the ensuing decades he participated in many important international exhibitions, including the Venice Biennale and Documenta, in Kassel, Germany. The Whitney produced its first Artschwager retrospective in 1988-89. It later traveled to San Francisco, Los Angeles, Madrid, Paris and Düsseldorf. His last solo exhibition with Gagosian Gallery was last fall at its branch in Rome featuring sculptures of pianos. “Early and late, his work stood out for its blunt, mute weirdness,” Holland Cotter wrote in The New York Times in reviewing the recent Artschwager retrospective at the Whitney. A 1963 sculpture, “Portrait II,” for example, resembles a bedroom dresser with no drawers and a sheet of Formica where a mirror might be. The table in “Table Prepared in the Presence of Enemies” (1993) “looks like a low-rise guillotine,” Mr. Cotter wrote. He added: “Violence is implicit in a lot of Mr. Artschwager’s art, which may be the most intriguing thing about it, the element that gives bite to what would otherwise pass for Magrittean whimsy.” Mr. Artschwager’s political views were less apparent. In 2003, he painted three identically framed portraits, of a blank President George W. Bush, a smiling Osama bin Laden and a grim-looking one of himself. “Each painting looks cracked, creviced and soiled, as if just dug up from rubble,” Mr. Cotter observed. Mr. Artschwager was married four times, the first three marriages ending in divorce. In addition to his wife, the former Ann Sebring, he is survived by his daughters Eva Artschwager and Clara Persis Artschwager; a son, Augustus Theodore Artschwager; a sister, Margarita Kay, and a grandson. David Nolan, whose Manhattan gallery has shown drawings by Mr. Artschwager, said the artist had recently exhibited new paintings and works on paper that he created on a return to New Mexico, inspired in part by the colors of the landscape there he had known so well as a boy. William McDonald contributed reporting. A version of this article appears in print on Feb. 11, 2013, on Page D8 of the New York edition with the headline: Richard Artschwager, Painter and Sculptor, Dies at 89. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe
Joan Hull
FLOWERS & GIFTS Joan L. Hull, 91, of Rhinebeck and formerly Hyde Park, passed away on November 5, 2018. Born in Brooklyn, New York on August 11, 1927 to Christine and J. Parker Hull, Joan grew up on an apple farm in Clintondale, New York. As a young girl, Joan, attended Westtown School in Westtown, Pennsylvania graduating in 1945. In 1949 Joan earned a degree from Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana and continued her education at Katherine Gibbs School, New York, New York, graduating in 1951. Afterwards, Joan moved to Hyde Park, New York with her parents and began working at Western Publishing Company, Poughkeepsie, New York in 1952. While at Western Publishing she was employed as an executive secretary until her retirement in 1982. Joan continued her career as an administrative assistant in the art department at Vassar College until 1992 after which she retired and took up residence in Rhinebeck, New York. Joan always said her years working with the art faculty at Vassar were her greatest joy and best memories. After retirement, Joan developed a passion for genealogy and spent countless hours searching historical records, compiling information from grave site tombstones, and documenting cultural and historic data from Friends’ Cemeteries. Additionally, Joan was a golfer and enjoyed her membership at Dutchess Golf Club in Poughkeepsie. Joan touched many people. She was a loyal friend to many and a devoted daughter who took great care of her parents until their passing. She loved a good laugh and enjoyed sipping an occasional Canadian Club with friends. Her laugh and sense of humor will be remembered, always. Her later years were spent quietly at the Baptist Home at Brookmeade in Rhinebeck, New York where she died peacefully. Joan is survived by many dear friends. There are no calling hours.
Jeffrey Schaire
1954-October 30, 1995 About the Archive This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them. Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems. Please send reports of such problems to archive_feedback@nytimes.com. November 1, 1995, Page 00019The New York Times Archives Jeffrey Schaire, a former editor in chief of Art and Antiques magazine, died on Monday at his home in Manhattan. He was 41. The cause was AIDS, said his sister, Paula. Mr. Schaire was born in Fresh Meadows, Queens. He graduated from the State University College at Binghamton and earned a master's degree in English literature from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. After working at Farrar, Straus & Giroux and at Harper's magazine, he joined Art and Antiques in 1983, and became editor in chief in 1987. Under his guidance, the magazine invited M. F. K. Fisher, D. M. Thomas, John Updike, Pete Hamill and others to write on art, and broke the story of Andrew Wyeth's unknown "Helga" paintings. After resigning in 1992, Mr. Schaire served briefly as editor of Body Positive, a magazine for those infected with the H.I.V. virus. In addition to his sister, of San Francisco and Manhattan, he is survived by a brother, Scott, of Atlanta. A version of this obituary; biography appears in print on November 1, 1995, on Page D00019 of the National edition with the headline: Jeffrey Schaire, 41, Art Magazine Editor. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe
Francesca Consagra
CONSAGRA--Francesca. Curator Emerita at the Blanton Museum of Art, died peacefully in Austin on December 16, 2018 after a valiant battle with ovarian cancer. She was 60. A daughter of Pietro Consagra, one of Italy's most prominent post-war abstract sculptors, and Sophie Chandler Consagra, Director and President of the American Academy in Rome, Francesca embodied the best of both cultures and families in her wonderful blend of sophisticated creativity and down- to-earth pragmatism. A brilliant scholar and curator of Italian Baroque and Northern Renaissance prints and paintings, Francesca brought deep passion and intellectual rigor to all she did. After graduating cum laude from Connecticut College, she received her Ph.D. in Art History from Johns Hopkins University. Following fellowships at the National Gallery, the Metropolitan Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Francesca was appointed the Philip and Lynn Straus Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, where she was also a member of the faculty in the Art Department. From 1999-2008, she served as Curator and Head of the Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Saint Louis Art Museum and subsequently became the Senior Curator at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts. In 2012, Francesca joined the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin, where she was the Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings, and European Paintings. Her numerous exhibitions and publications reflected Francesca's broad historical and cultural knowledge as well as her gift for communicating complex ideas with grace and eloquence. Francesca's warmth, kindness, intelligence, and love of life were reflected in her fervent engagement with the world around her. Beauty in its many forms filled her soul, from a master drawing or a second-century Buddha, to a 'Sconset sunset or a swim off the beaches of Crete. Francesca was deeply loved by her family and friends, who treasured her generosity of spirit, her commitment to the greater good, her fabulous sense of humor, her resolute honesty, her courage, and her strength. Francesca is survived by her husband William Herndon, the love of her life, and her beloved son John Ray. Published in The New York Times on Dec. 21, 2018
Ethel Plimack
Ethel’s mantra, shared with her siblings, was “keep moving”—and that she did. Whether it was working, folk dancing, knitting or swimming, Ethel always kept moving during her life time. And what a long life time it was—two weeks shy of 108 years. Apart from early family gatherings, my first memory was of my aunt Ethel sending me magazines at summer camp. Later in life, books of all subjects, from various programs at Marymount, found their way to me. Then there was the knitting. Lots of favorite sweaters were knitted by Aunt Ethel. More recently, with Janet’s help and encouragement, baby hats and scarves galore were shared with many. When I hurt my back at age 30 in New York, and could barely get out of bed--Ethel came to the rescue and cooked some meals for me. We were able to return the cooking favor when Ethel visited Beth and me in D.C. She loved the home-made waffles -- made on my parents’ old waffle maker. Whenever we talked about her visits, she mentioned the waffles and the bonsai collection at the Arboretum—another favorite.. Then there was the “sister act” between Ethel and Shirley. We learned that you are never too old to argue about who dad loved best! And who would have thought that Ethel would have become the fashionista these past few years—certainly not Shirley! Thank you Josie! Ethel was a doer, not a complainer. However, she did complain when Janet insisted she write a will at age 99! She had hoped not to have to deal with such issues—and she sure beat all odds at doing so! Ethel will be missed. 11/7/18 Written by Robin (Sherman?) Sylvia Plimack Mangold's cousin
Harriet Shorr
Acclaimed American painter and teacher, died on Saturday, April 9th at Beth Israel Hospital, age 76. She was ill for several years, but the immediate cause of death was pneumonia. Harriet was Professor Emerita at the School of Art and Design at Purchase College. She was known for large-scale realistic still life paintings that were full of light and color. Harriet was also an extraordinarily gifted writer and poet. She leaves her husband Jim Long, daughters Ruth and Sasha, three grandchildren and her brother Bill Shorr. Harriet grew up in Sea Gate in Brooklyn and is remembered with pride and love by her childhood friends Roberta, Simmie and Linda. Published in The New York Times on Apr. 14, 2016
Vibha Nagrath Dhingra
Vibha Nagrath Dhingra 3/27/2019 Vibha Nagrath Dhingra, age 74, of Nashua, NH, formerly of Winchester, passed away on March 27, 2019. Vibha was born in her grandfather Lala Ralya Ram Nagrath‘s home on Keeling Road, New Delhi, India on September 21, 1944. Despite losing her mother, Jasmati Devi Nagrath, when she was only six month’s old and her father Inderjit Nagrath, when she was only four, Vibha had a happy childhood in her grandfather’s house. She and her older sister Abha, were lovingly raised by their younger brother Ranjit Nagrath’s mother Savitri Devi Nagrath and were lucky to have the love and care of a large extended family including their grandparents and many aunts, uncles and cousins. Vibha attended boarding school in the foothills of the Himalayas from the age of four. She completed her elementary, secondary, and collegiate studies at the Sacred Heart Convent School in Dalhousie. Her lifelong love of nature and her indelible connection to the mountains began there. In 1966, at the age of 22, she married Satish Dhingra and they moved, first to Canada, and then to the United States. While Satish pursued his master’s degree, Vibha got her green card and her first job, as a clerk in the computer lab at MIT. Vibha and Satish welcomed their first son, Anand in 1969 and their second son, Vivek in 1976 and just six months later, Vibha became a citizen of the United States. After living in Cambridge and Belmont, they settled in Winchester, MA in 1978. When they separated in 1980, Vibha became a single mother. After being a stay-at-home mom for many years, Vibha worked tirelessly to support her sons. She never remarried, singular in her focus on her children and her desire to maintain her independence. In 1983 Vibha completed her MBA from Suffolk University. Despite their divorce in 1986, Vibha maintained a cordial relationship with her ex-husband, until his death in November 2017. After a successful career in corporate accounting, Vibha retired in 2009 and moved to Nashua, NH. She spent the last year at Apple Valley Center in Ayer, MA where she made many friends among the staff and residents. Vibha loved animals, especially dogs. She enjoyed international travel and learning about history; she loved to read biographies and discuss current events. She had a beautiful voice and enjoyed singing classical Indian music as well as hymns in English. In recent years, she spent considerable time in her garden. She loved plants and flowers and was especially fond of peonies. Vibha enjoyed a wide circle of friends from every chapter of her life. Her two grandsons were her pride and joy. Vibha is survived by her sister Abha Gupta (née Nagrath) and her husband Promod Gupta of New Delhi, India; her son Anand Dhingra and his wife Holly (née Parker) of Nashua, NH; her son Vivek Dhingra and his wife Catherine (née Bingham) and her grandsons Nikhil and Rhys of Wakefield, MA; as well as many cousins, in-laws, nieces and nephews and countless friends. Relatives and friends are kindly invited to attend a Memorial Service to be held at Costello Funeral Home, Saturday April 6th 2019 from 1pm to 2pm. Visiting hours will follow the service from 2pm to 5pm. Sign Driving Directions Print Page Share Costello Funeral Home 177 Washington Street Winchester, MA USA 01890 781-729-1730 HOME / BACK
Kay Murphy
Catherine Ellen O'Reilly Murphy (Kay Murphy), August 25, 1905 (in Cambridge, MA) - August 10, 1991 (in Ayer, MA).
Sam Beall
Sam Beall
Rudy Burckhard
Rudy Burckhardt. An obituary of artist Rudy Burckhardt can be found in the New York Times, August 4, 1999, http://www.nytimes.com/1999/08/04/arts/rudy-burckhardt-85-photographer-and-filmmaker-dies.html.
Judy and Frederick Busch
Judy and Frederick Busch. Poet and novelist Frederick Busch's obituary can be found in the New York Times, February 25, 2006, at http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/25/pageoneplus/arts/frederick-busch-author-of-poetic-fiction-dies-at-64-827150.html; Judy Busch's obituary can be found in the Evening Sun, Jaunary 4, 2007, at http://www.evesun.com/obituaries/people/Judith-Busch/379/.
Aunt Sophie
Aunt Sophie
Teddy Sullivan
Teddy Sullivan. Teddy (Edward Patrick Sullivan), February 29, 1936-Novemebr 15, 2000. Catherine Murphy's cousin, brother of Billy Sullivan.
John Chamberlain
John Chamberlain. Artist John Chamberlain's obituary can be found in the New York Times, December 22, 2011, at http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/22/arts/design/john-chamberlain-artist-of-auto-metal-dies-at-84.html.
Jerome Badanes
Jerome Badanes. Novelist Jerome Badanes's obituary can be found at http://www.nytimes.com/1995/05/21/obituaries/jerome-badanes-novelist-dies-at-58.html.
Nancy Graves
October 24, 1995, The New York Times Archives. Nancy Graves, an erudite Post-Minimalist artist who combined abstraction with an exacting naturalism, died on Saturday at New N.Y. The cause was cancer, said her husband, Avery L. Smith. A prolific artist who worked in painting, sculpture, printmaking and film, Ms. Graves first made her presence felt on the New York art scene in the late 1960's and 70's, with life-size sculptures of camels that seemed as accurate as a natural history display (down to the real skin). Closer examination, however, revealed myriad distortions of both form and surface, as well as deliberate signs of handwork, so that the ultimate effect was strangely abstract. Although idiosyncratic, the camels were representative of a widespread effort among younger artists to take Minimalism's emphasis on given facts and forms, as well as new materials, into unexpected areas. Like-minded artists included Eva Hesse, Chuck Close, Bruce Nauman and Richard Serra, to whom Ms. Graves was married from 1965 to 1970. Nancy Stevenson Graves was born in Pittsfield, Mass., on Dec. 23, 1940, and throughout her life she retained the reserve and dry humor of a quintessential New Englander. Her dual interest in art and science was encouraged by frequent visits to the Berkshire Museum, where her father worked and which had collections devoted to both art and natural history. After graduating from Vassar College as an English major in 1961, she attended Yale, where she earned bachelor's and master's of fine arts degrees from the School of Art and Architecture in 1964. Grants enabled her to spend the next two years studying in Europe, first in Paris and then in Florence, where the life-size wax studies of an 18th-century anatomist named Susini inspired her to work from natural forms. Continue reading the main story She settled on the camel as the first of these forms, and with typical thoroughness spent three months learning carpentry to be able to devise an armature. Working in Fiberglas, latex, marble dust and other unorthodox materials, Ms. Graves moved on to camel skeletons and bones, which she dispersed about the floor or hung from ceilings, and based other works on a variety of archeological and paleontological subjects, including fossils, totems and mummies. In the early 1970's, she traveled to Morocco, making several films whose repeated sequences of camel herds emphasized the mesmerizing rhythms of their movements. In 1972 Ms. Graves forsook sculpture for painting, making beautifully colored, ostensibly abstract works that were often based on a wide range of maps and charts, including those of the ocean floor and the surfaces of Mars and the moon. When she returned to sculpture in the late 1970's, she learned the lost-wax process so she could work in bronze, experimenting with unusual patinas that translated her natural forms into a palette of highly artificial hot pinks, blues and yellows. She gradually expanded her vocabulary to include not only plants, flowers, fish and occasional pieces of the human skeleton but also man-made objects like fans, colanders and tools. These disparate parts were assembled into gracefully balanced sculptures whose elegant linearity recalled the "drawing in space" sculptures of David Smith. At the end of her life, Ms. Graves was incorporating handblown glass into her sculptures and experimenting with poly-optics, a glasslike material that can be cast. Ms. Graves, whose first New York exhibition was at the Graham Gallery in 1968, has been represented by M. Knoedler & Company since 1980. She exhibited extensively in galleries in the United States and Europe and is represented in museums around the world. Her most recent museum retrospective, organized by the Fort Worth Art Museum, traveled to the Brooklyn Museum in 1987. An exhibition of new hand-painted prints closed on Saturday at the Betsy Senior Gallery in SoHo. In addition to her husband, she is survived by her mother, Mary Bates of Pittsfield; a sister, Judith G. Clarke of Worthington, Mass., and two stepsons, Barrett L. and Carter L. Smith.
Herb Vogel
Herb Vogel. Art collector Herbert Vogel's obituary can be found in the New York Times, July 23, 2012, at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/24/arts/design/herbert-vogel-postal-clerk-and-modern-art-collector-dies-at-89.html.
Robert Fosdick
Robert Fosdick. Robert was a friend of Robin Hill and Tom Bills. We met him visiting them in Nova Scotia.
Willie Chose
Willie Choset. Willie Choset was my uncle. He was married to my father's sister Eleanor Choset (born Roseman)
Robert Schoelkopf
Robert Schoelkoff. An obituary of art dealer Robert Schoelkoff can be found in the New York Times, April 6, 1991, at http://www.nytimes.com/1991/04/06/obituaries/robert-schoelkopf-art-dealer-was-63.html.
Leo Moore
Leo Moore. Leo was my uncle. He was married to my mother's sister, Sylvia Moore (born, Silverman).
Jean Michel Basquiat
Jean Michel Basquiat. Artist Jean Michael Basquiat's obituary can be found at http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/08/09/specials/basquiat-obit.html.
Vinnie Dolan
Vinnie Dolan, May 17, 1916 - December 21, 2000, Vinnie Dolan was Diane Sullivan's father. Diane is married to Paul Sulliva, Catherine Murphy's first cousin. Thus we are all cousins.
Barbara Anderson
Barbara Anderson
Helen Renzi
Helen Renzi. An obituary of Helen Renzi can be found at Williamstown.com, July 14, 2012, at http://www.williamstown.com/obituaries_new.php?ob_id=9831.
Xavier Foucade
Xavier Fourcade, 1927-1987. An obituary of art dealer Xavier Foucade can be found at the New York Times, April 29, 1987, at http://www.nytimes.com/1987/04/29/obituaries/xavier-fourcade-dead-at-60-dealer-in-contemporary-art.html.
Bolek Greczynski
Bolec Greczynski. An obituary of art therapist Bolec Greczynski can be found in the New York Times, March 10, 1995, at http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/10/obituaries/bolek-greczynski-44-art-therapist-at-creedmoor.html.
Ralph Renzi
Ralph Renzi
Irving Alper
Irving Alpert. Irving and Florence Alpert were frinds of my parents.
Murray Skall
Murray Skall. My cousin.
Dave Dresher
Dave Dresher. Dave was married to my mother's niece.
Linda Neely
Linda Neely
Louis Roseman
Louis Francis Murphy (Frank Murphy), January 13, 1903 (in Boston, MA)-July 15, 1979 (in Ayer, MA)
Jake Berthot
The New York Times By Roberta Smith Jan. 14, 2015 Jake Berthot, a painter who gained notice in New York City for his romantically minimal style, then found inspiration in the natural world after moving north to a hamlet in Ulster County, died on Dec. 30 at his home in Accord, N.Y. He was 75. Betty Cuningham, whose gallery represented him, confirmed his death. She said he had long been ill but did not specify a cause. Mr. Berthot (pronounced BEAR-TOE) had a brief flirtation with Minimal Art in the mid-1960s. But, like many members of his generation, he soon sought ways to soften, complicate and enrich the style’s severity. He was guided in this by his admiration for Abstract Expressionists like Milton Resnick and Mark Rothko, whose work was simplified but emotive. He began to work in subtle monochromes of gray and green in the late 1960s in a manner similar to that of the painter Brice Marden. But Mr. Berthot’s surfaces were differentiated by their expressive texture and their suggestions of space and atmosphere. In many ways, Mr. Berthot spent his career exploring how to supplement and expand on the modernist monochrome without straying too far from it. At first he attached narrow vertical bars to either side of all-gray canvases. He also framed thickly worked monochromes with more thinly painted canvases, creating the effect of a window or of an abstract painting within an abstract painting. For a while he pursued thickly built-up surfaces to which he added ovals or column-like rectangles in contrasting, sometimes even bright, colors. Most of his paintings began with an underlying grid of pencil that his brushwork alternately denied and confirmed. After 1996, when Mr. Berthot left Manhattan for Accord, the natural world became an increasing influence. He turned to depicting trees and hills so close in tone to their backgrounds that they almost seemed carved from them. Some of his most beautiful paintings were nocturnal landscapes or expanses of night skies illuminated by a few rays from the moon. These works had a timeless quality and reflected his admiration for 19th-century landscape painters like George Inness, Albert Pinkham Ryder and J. M. W. Turner. He once told an interviewer that he was “not interested in the new but in trying to make paintings that refuse to grow old.” His art started rounding back toward abstraction in 2008. John Alex Berthot was born in Niagara Falls, N.Y., on March 30, 1939. His father abandoned the family when John was quite young, and he grew up on his grandparents’ truck farm in central Pennsylvania. He received his first drawing lessons from his grandmother. Mr. Berthot initially studied at a commercial art school in Pittsburgh but realized that he lacked the necessary precision in drawing. Moving to New York City, he worked as a window dresser in the Bronx. When his wife got a secretarial job at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, he was able to attend classes there tuition free. At Pratt he began to paint seriously and soon had his first experience as a teacher. Starting in 1974, he taught for extended periods at the Cooper Union, Yale University and the School of Visual Arts. Mr. Berthot had his first gallery show in New York in 1963 and showed regularly at the McKee Gallery and then the Betty Cuningham Gallery, both in Manhattan. Surveys of his work were held at Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass., in 1988 and at the Phillips Collection in Washington in 1996. When he decided to bequeath the paintings in his studio to the Phillips, the museum offered to exhibit them, as a gift, during his lifetime. Mr. Berthot, who once described painting as “the only thing I can do,” declined, saying that he needed the paintings around him. His marriages to Ginny MacKenzie and Kristin Flynn both ended in divorce. He is survived by his son, John, from his first marriage. A version of this article appears in print on Jan. 19, 2015, on Page A14 of the New York edition with the headline: Jake Berthot, 75, Abstract Painter Inspired by Nature. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe
Elaine Shipman
Elaine Shipman. An obituary of choreographer Elaine Shipman can be found in the New York Times, March 22, 2013, at http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/nytimes/obituary.aspx?pid=163771281.
Mary Buckly
Mary Buckly
Chip Elwell
Chip Elwell. Died in 1986
Florence Alper
Florence Alpert. Florence and her husband Irving were friends of my parents
Alice Eisen
Alice Eisen
Romulis Linney
Romulis Linney
Roy Davis
Roy Davis. An obituary for art dealr Roy Davis can be found in Art Media Agency, September 17, 2014, at http://en.artmediaagency.com/94297/art-dealer-roy-davis-passes-away/.
Wendy Wasserstein
Wendy Wasserstein. An obituary for playwright Wendy Wasserstein can be found in the New York Times, January 31, 2006, at http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/31/theater/31wasserstein.html.
Harriet Moore
Harriet Moore. My first Cousin.
Warner Ragland
Warner Ragland. Deceased around 1992, A friend of my brother, Neil Roseman. They went to the Culinary Institute of America together, where they met.
Neil Roseman
Neil Roseman (1950-1992), My brother.
Richard Singer
Richard Singer

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